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The UCLA Bioengineering B.S. Degree is ABET Accredited

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The Bachelor of Science program in the Department of Bioengineering has successfully completed its first ever ABET accreditation review!  The ABET accreditation has been conferred beginning with our most recent June 2013 graduates.  For more information on ABET accreditation, please visit http://abet.org/vision-mission/

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BE Faculty Dr. CJ Kim creates "superomniphobic surface" that repels everything

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Superhydrophobic and superoleophobic surfaces have so far been made by roughening a hydrophobic material. However, no surfaces were able to repel extremely-low-energy liquids such as fluorinated solvents, which completely wet even the most hydrophobic material. We show how roughness alone, if made of a specific doubly reentrant structure that enables very low liquid-solid contact fraction, can render the surface of any material superrepellent. Starting from a completely wettable material (silica), we micro- and nanostructure its surface to make it superomniphobic and bounce off all available liquids, including perfluorohexane. The same superomniphobicity is further confirmed with identical surfaces of a metal and a polymer. Free of any hydrophobic coating, the superomniphobic silica surface also withstands temperatures over 1000°C and resists biofouling.

Read the full article here

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BE Faculty Dr. Zangle and Dr. Teitell quantify cell mass during cancer growth and stem cell differentiation

 

UCLA BE faculty Dr. Zangle and Dr. Teitell describe the available methods for single cell mass measurements in a paper published in the peer reviewed journal Nature Methods. Cell mass, volume and growth rate are tightly controlled biophysical parameters in cellular development and homeostasis, and pathological cell growth defines cancer in metazoans. The first measurements of cell mass were made in the 1950s, but only recently have advances in computer science and microfabrication spurred the rapid development of precision mass-quantifying approaches. Dr. Zangle and Dr. Teitell’s paper discusses available techniques for quantifying the mass of single live cells with an emphasis on relative features, capabilities and drawbacks. Recent applications of live cell mass measurements summarized in this publication include measurement of cell cycle dependent growth as well as Dr. Zangle and Dr. Teitell’s work on live cell mass profiling for evaluation of cancer therapeutic strategies and stem cell differentiation.

Read the full article here

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BE Faculty Dr. Di Carlo Awarded 2014 Analytical Chemistry Young Innovator Award

 

Dr. Dino Di Carlo received the 2014 Analytical Chemistry Young Innovator Award at the MicroTAS conference on October 28. 

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This award, sponsored by the Analytical Chemistry journal and the Chemical and Biological Microsystems Division (CBMS), recognizes the contributions of an individual who has demonstrated exceptional technical advancement and innovation in the field of micro- or nanofluidics in his or her early career.

Learn more about the Young Innovator award here.

More information on MicroTAS can be found here.

 

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BE Faculty Dr. Kasko and Dr. Wong engineer persister-specific antibiotics

 
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Most antibiotics target growth processes and are ineffective against persister bacterial cells, which tolerate antibiotics due to their reduced metabolic activity. These persisters act as a genetic reservoir for resistant mutants and constitute a root cause of antibiotic resistance, a worldwide problem in human health. We re-engineer antibiotics specifically for persisters using tobramycin, an aminoglycoside antibiotic that targets bacterial ribosomes but is ineffective against persisters with low metabolic and cellular transport activity. By giving tobramycin the ability to induce nanoscopic negative Gaussian membrane curvature via addition of 12 amino acids, we transform tobramycin itself into a transporter sequence. The resulting molecule spontaneously permeates membranes, retains the high antibiotic activity of aminoglycosides, kills E. coli and S. aureus persisters 4–6 logs better than tobramycin, but remains noncytotoxic to eukaryotes. These results suggest a promising paradigm to renovate traditional antibiotics.

 

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BE Undergraduate Shannon Wongvibulsin awarded 2013-2014 HSSEAS Schoolwide Outstanding Bachelor of Science Award

 

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Bioengineering senior Shannon Wongvibulsin has been awarded the 2013-2014 HSSEAS Schoolwide Outstanding Bachelor of Science Award.  School-wide awards were selected by a committee comprised of students, faculty, and staff.  The award will be acknowledged in the 2014 HSSEAS Commencement program and at the ceremony.  The Department of Bioengineering has only had 8 years of graduates, and Shannon is the 7th student from the Department to be selected for this honor.  The other students selected for this honor were Jaideep Dudani (2012-2013), Armin Arshi (2011-2012), Shivani Dharmaraja (2010-2011), Byron Kwan (2009-2010), Nicholas Kusnezov (2008-2009), and James Pinney (2006-2007).        Read more...

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Bioengineering Grad Kristine Mayle named C200 Scholar

 
"Kristine Mayle, a Ph.D. student in bioengineering at the UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science, recently was named a Larraine Segil C200 Scholar. The honor, from the Committee of 200 recognizes outstanding women studying in a field of science, technology, engineering, or mathematics (STEM) with leadership potential, entrepreneurial spirit and a commitment to supporting women.  A member of Professor Daniel T. Kamei’s laboratory, Mayle enrolled at UCLA after graduating from Ohio University with bachelor’s degree in chemical engineering.  She is also a recipient of the National Science Foundation’s Graduate Research Fellowship. Mayle answered a few questions on her studies and plans here."
 

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Bioengineering Faculty Chih-Ming Ho elected a distinguished Fellow of the AIMBE

 

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UCLA MAE Professor Chih-Ming Ho has been elected a distinguished Fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE) for his seminal impacts made in the microfluidic system technology for applications in medical diagnosis and biological research. The induction of the Class of 2014 took place on March 24, 2014, at the National Academy of Sciences (NAS).

AIMBE is the authoritative voice and advocate for the value of medical and biological engineering to society. It is an organization of leaders in medical and biological engineering, consisting of academic, industrial, professional society councils and elected Fellows.

 
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UCLA Bioengineering top 10 in National Research Council Rankings 

 

UCLA Bioengineering ranked in the top 10 of all bioengineering doctorate programs across the country based on a recent evaluation by the independent National Research Council (NRC). Both survey-based and regression-based rankings placed UCLA BE in top 10. More details on the rankings can be found at http://www.nap.edu/rdp/

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